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Sunshine Coast, Fraser Coast and South Burnett

Back on the Road

As our time in AU neared an end, we took one last road trip. First, we headed north of Brisbane, to both the Sunshine and Fraser coastlines. We had originally planned to visit this area before Cyclone Debbie intervened.

The Glasshouse Mountains

We started our trip to the Sunshine Coast by detouring off of the Bruce Highway to hinterland. We traveled along Steve Irwin Way which leads to the Australia Zoo. Although we did not visit it, this is the zoo that was started by Irwin's parents and is now owned by his wife. We drove through the township of Glass House Mountains on our way to actual park of the same name.

Lieutenant James Cook ( later Captain) was responsible for the naming of the Glass House Mountains. They reminded him of the chimney stacks of the glass manufacturing furnaces back in England, called glasshouses.

A few of the Glass House Mountains, as viewed from lookout.

A few of the Glass House Mountains, as viewed from lookout.

A couple of the "volcanic plugs" that are a part of the Glass House Mountains.

A couple of the "volcanic plugs" that are a part of the Glass House Mountains.

Sunshine Coast

The Sunshine Coast stretches from Caloundra in the south to the edge of the Great Sandy National Park in the north. It is about 75 miles long and starts about 40 miles north of Brisbane. This is generally a quieter and less developed coastline than the Gold Coast area south of Brisbane. The one exception we found to that, was in the little resort town of Noosa. It was so busy we had a hard time finding a parking space.

We started seeing this type of palm at the Sunshine Coast

We started seeing this type of palm at the Sunshine Coast

A school group walking on the Kawana Beach at Caloundra.

A school group walking on the Kawana Beach at Caloundra.

At Noosa Head, it was the brush turkeys on the beach instead of kangaroos!

At Noosa Head, it was the brush turkeys on the beach instead of kangaroos!

Fraser Coast

The coastline north of the Sunshine Coast is called the Fraser Coast. Our two main stops here were at Hervey Bay and Bundaberg. We also spent the night at Maryborough; it's claim to fame is that Mary Poppins author P.L. Travers was born there.

Hervey Bay

It was raining when we arrived in the Hervey Bay but we slogged on until it stopped. Hervey Bay is a small coastal town that is part of the Great Sandy Marine Park, and looks out on the worlds largest sand island, Fraser Island. This is also a base for visiting Lady Elliot Island, which is the first sand cay at the southern tip of the Great Barrier Reef.

The Urangan Pier was built in 1913 to reach a deep water channel.  It was needed because of all the sand here. The pier was used to transfer coal, sugar, and timber between the rail and ships.

The Urangan Pier was built in 1913 to reach a deep water channel. It was needed because of all the sand here. The pier was used to transfer coal, sugar, and timber between the rail and ships.

They don't call it the Great Sandy Maine Park for nothing...sand as far as the eye can see!

They don't call it the Great Sandy Maine Park for nothing...sand as far as the eye can see!

The Botanic Gardens at Hervey Bay.

The Botanic Gardens at Hervey Bay.

The Chinese garden at the Botanic Gardens.

The Chinese garden at the Botanic Gardens.

Some pretty good camouflage at the Botanic Garden.

Some pretty good camouflage at the Botanic Garden.

This guy was also trying his hand at camouflage!

This guy was also trying his hand at camouflage!

Bundaberg

Bundaberg was as far north of Brisbane as we would go on this little road trip. It is a "cane town," located on the Burnett River, about nine miles from the QLD coastline. Bundaberg's most famous business is probably the Bundaberg Rum Distelllery. It's most famous resident was the aviator Bert Hinkler; he was the first person to fly solo from England to Australia. It also has several historic churches and buildings that we enjoyed looking at on our walk around town.

The Buss Park Garden has a memorial to Bret Hinkler. It's surrounded by two famous churches: St. Andrews and Christ Church.

The Buss Park Garden has a memorial to Bret Hinkler. It's surrounded by two famous churches: St. Andrews and Christ Church.


Bert Hinkler was an aviation pioneer from Bundaberg. He not only designed and built aircraft, but was the first person to fly solo from England to Australia. He also was the first person to fly solo across the Southern Atlantic Ocean and the second to cross the Atlantic Ocean solo, after Charles Lindbergh. He died in 1933 when his plane crashed near Florence, Italy.

Bert Hinkler was an aviation pioneer from Bundaberg. He not only designed and built aircraft, but was the first person to fly solo from England to Australia. He also was the first person to fly solo across the Southern Atlantic Ocean and the second to cross the Atlantic Ocean solo, after Charles Lindbergh. He died in 1933 when his plane crashed near Florence, Italy.


The Bundaberg War Memorial is located on a traffic island in the CBD. In the background is the post office and the clock tower.

The Bundaberg War Memorial is located on a traffic island in the CBD. In the background is the post office and the clock tower.


The fountain at Bourbong Street in Bundaberg.

The fountain at Bourbong Street in Bundaberg.

This tree was in bloom all over Bundaberg.

This tree was in bloom all over Bundaberg.

South Burnett Region

After leaving the Fraser Coast, we travelled to the South Burnett Region. This has long been cattle and grain-growing country, but since 2003, it lays claim to being Queensland's biggest wine growing region. We visited the towns of Wondai and Kingaroy.

Wondai

Wondai is small town that was founded because of it's dairy and timber industries. Today, it benefits from being surrounded by several of the South Burnett's wine industry towns. The name "Wondai" is aboriginal for dingo. I'm sure I will remember it for Charlotte!

As we approached Wondai, the mountains of the Great Diviiding Range were in the distance.

As we approached Wondai, the mountains of the Great Diviiding Range were in the distance.


This brightly colored building is the Wondai Shire Regional Art Gallery. It is in the former Staion Master's home.  Appropriately, there is a dingo sculpture here!.

This brightly colored building is the Wondai Shire Regional Art Gallery. It is in the former Staion Master's home. Appropriately, there is a dingo sculpture here!.


Charlotte The Emu in Wondai, QLD.

Charlotte The Emu in Wondai, QLD.

Charlotte's story. Evidently, the rest of the story involves an accident...the details I would rather not know!😢

Charlotte's story. Evidently, the rest of the story involves an accident...the details I would rather not know!😢

Kingaroy

Kingaroy is the largest town in the South Burnett region at around 8,000 residents. The name comes from the aboriginal word "Kingarooi" which means red ant. The first thing you notice, when arriving here, are two huge silos of the Peanut Company of Australia. We stayed here on our way to the nearby Bunya Mountains.

The twin silos of the Peanut Company of Australia (PCA) in Kingaroy. Peanuts have been grown here since the 1920's PCA has developed a new breed of peanut called Hi oleic. These peanuts are higher in monounsaturated or "good" oils and are said to stay fresh longer.

The twin silos of the Peanut Company of Australia (PCA) in Kingaroy. Peanuts have been grown here since the 1920's PCA has developed a new breed of peanut called Hi oleic. These peanuts are higher in monounsaturated or "good" oils and are said to stay fresh longer.

Bicentennial quilt that illustrates Kingaroy Shire history.

Bicentennial quilt that illustrates Kingaroy Shire history.

Posted by Charedwards 04:00

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Comments

Your wonderful narrative and pics continue to amaze! Thanks for sharing.

by mary titterington

You certainly made the best of your road trip and visited some interesting off the beaten path places. Good comentary and nice pix. Well done
Cheers
Ann

by aussirose

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