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The Blue Mountains

Spring and Fall

On our return trip to Sydney, we stopped in some new areas of the Blue Mountains. Our first visit there was by train in the spring (October of 2016); this time we would get to see what it looked like in the fall.

The Blue Mountains Botanic Garden

One of the prettiest stops we had in the Blue Mountains was at this garden on the top of Mt Tomah. It is a cool climate garden and features plants from the cooler regions of the world, especially from the Southern Hemisphere. The Garden has been open 30 years. It was originally a private cut flower farm until the owners gave the Garden to the Royal Botanic Garden of Sydney.

Beautiful late fall colors at the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden.

Beautiful late fall colors at the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden.


The view from the observation deck, looking across the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden.

The view from the observation deck, looking across the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden.


Another view of the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden.

Another view of the Blue Mountains Botanic Garden.

One of the prettiest locations at the gardens. The rough tree fern on the right is seen frequently in the Blue Mountains.

One of the prettiest locations at the gardens. The rough tree fern on the right is seen frequently in the Blue Mountains.

]A flowering bush that I liked at the gardens.

A flowering bush that I liked at the gardens.


A type of Banksia that we saw at Mt Tomah.

A type of Banksia that we saw at Mt Tomah.

Blackheath

In Blackheath we drove to the end of Govetts Leap Road to find this lookout over the Blue Mountains.
The two pictures below (if put together) would be a panoramic view of Grose Valley, Mt Banks, Mt Hay and Govetts Leap Waterfall on right.

From the lookout, the view to the right is of Govetts Leap Waterfall.

From the lookout, the view to the right is of Govetts Leap Waterfall.


The rest of the view across the valley.

The rest of the view across the valley.

Katoomba

Katoomba is the most visited village in the Blue Mountains. We stayed near Echo Point, which is a cliffside lookout that offers a great view of the Three Sisters. From Echo point, we walked down the 800 steps of the Giant Stairway to the valley floor. We took the Federal Pass trail past Katoomba Falls, and then we climbed the Furber Steps back up to the top. The walk took about 3 hours and my legs felt it for a few days after!

The Three Sisters, as viewed from Echo Point. There was a controlled burn taking place on the other side of the valley.

The Three Sisters, as viewed from Echo Point. There was a controlled burn taking place on the other side of the valley.

Greg tackling the 800 Giant Steps to the valley trail.

Greg tackling the 800 Giant Steps to the valley trail.

The Giant Steps pass near one of the Three Sisters.

The Giant Steps pass near one of the Three Sisters.

The Katoomba Waterfall in the Blue Mountains

The Katoomba Waterfall in the Blue Mountains

A beautiful stream that we saw near end of our walk at Echo Point.

A beautiful stream that we saw near end of our walk at Echo Point.

Our view across the valley as we returned to Echo Point.

Our view across the valley as we returned to Echo Point.

This is late afternoon view of the Three Sisters; the smoke had spread across the valley.

This is late afternoon view of the Three Sisters; the smoke had spread across the valley.

Fall colors at the Kingston Smith Memorial Park in Katoomba, NSW.

Fall colors at the Kingston Smith Memorial Park in Katoomba, NSW.

The Carrington was built in 1880; it's presence was significant in that it attracted the wealthy from Sydney to visit the Blue Mountains.

The Carrington was built in 1880; it's presence was significant in that it attracted the wealthy from Sydney to visit the Blue Mountains.

Wentworth Falls

In October of 2016, we made our first visit to the Blue Mountains. We got off the train at the village of Wentworth Falls. We took the Charles Darwin Walk to the actual Wentworth Falls and then continued on the National Pass Trail.

Wentworth Falls was named after William Charles Wentworth. He was one of the men who led an expedition which successfully found a route through the Blue Mountains.

Wentworth Falls was named after William Charles Wentworth. He was one of the men who led an expedition which successfully found a route through the Blue Mountains.

Charles Darwin stayed in Wentworth Falls in 1836. The Charles Darwin Walk that we took to the actual falls, supposedly follows the route he took.

Charles Darwin stayed in Wentworth Falls in 1836. The Charles Darwin Walk that we took to the actual falls, supposedly follows the route he took.

Wentworth Falls in the Blue Mountains.

Wentworth Falls in the Blue Mountains.

After leaving Wentworth Falls, we hiked the 6 km National Pass Trail around the cliff face and down into the valley.

After leaving Wentworth Falls, we hiked the 6 km National Pass Trail around the cliff face and down into the valley.

At the start of the National Pass Trail, we walked around the cliff face pictured here. I can not imagine how scary this was to build in1908.

At the start of the National Pass Trail, we walked around the cliff face pictured here. I can not imagine how scary this was to build in1908.

Toward the end of our walk on the National Trail, we saw this group abseiling at the Empress Falls.

Toward the end of our walk on the National Trail, we saw this group abseiling at the Empress Falls.

Posted by Charedwards 18:03

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